Perfect Smiles Orthodontics Blog

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What is the ideal bite?

The ideal smile is desired by almost every person, but not many people realize the importance of an ideal bite. You may be surprised to know how many people fail to realize that they have a problem with their bite. It's not until they develop a problem or are informed by an orthodontist about it, do they understand that their bite is off. So, what really is an ideal bite? An ideal bite may be described as a bite where the teeth of the upper jaw come in contact with those of the lower one at the same time when the mouth is closed. At the same time, the top teeth should only cover half of the lower ones at max.

There are a number of different types of abnormal bites that may be developed due to certain habits in young children or due to other dental manipulations. Here we describe the most common abnormal bites that a person can have.



  • A Deep bite, is one where the upper incisors cover the lower teeth too much when your mouth is closed.
  • An Open bite is one where the upper teeth just do not overlap with lower ones enough.
  • A Cross bite is a type of bite where the teeth cross over one another because the arch isn't perfect.
  • An overbite is where the upper teeth stick out in front of the lower ones. 


How do we develop poor bites?

There are multiple causes of these abnormal bites. Some can be caused due to damage to the teeth, or have been affected by trauma impacting jaw development. It's common to have misalignments after a dental procedure, but not treating that condition can lead to long-term problems for you. Sometimes, a common treatment like a dental filling or a root canal may shift your tooth into a misaligned position that disturbs your whole bite.

Another reason can be inflammation. The Jaw joints are susceptible to being inflamed, and any such process can lead to severe pain and inability to open or close the mouth. Also, some people have bad habits like grinding their teeth which can lead to bite defects.

A bite defect, although initially not of significance, can cause problems in the long run. They can cause discomfort on closing your teeth and can be cosmetically deforming. Also, any abnormal bite that is making a particular tooth touch the lower jaw first, will result in extra sensitivity and pain in that tooth. Besides this, an abnormal bite may cause severe wear of your teeth by constantly grinding against each other. This will make your enamel wear down at a much faster rate than normal to expose your teeth to harmful carious bacteria.

So, are there any ways that you can correct these problems?

As a matter of fact, there are. You can have that ideal bite, and the good thing is that it isn't complicated either. There are a number of ways that an orthodontist can assess a bad bite and treat it. Once the cause is identified, the orthodontist can improve the cosmetic appearance as well as the function by correcting the problematic tooth or teeth with manipulating your teeth and jaw. These procedures can help relieve the pain and discomfort during eating, talking or just closing your mouth, in general.All in all, we do know the importance of having the perfect smile, it's time we get that perfect bite too!  

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Health Benefits of Having Braces

There is no doubt in anyone's mind that the payoff of getting braces is having a great smile once they are removed. However, the aesthetic advantage of braces is just one of the many benefits that might not be known to a lot of people.

Correct alignment of teeth not only looks good but it also feels good to chew with them as they are more effective in gnashing food into tiny pieces. This easier and more effective way of breaking down what we eat also leads to easier digestion and is very helpful to those who might have nutritional or chewing problems.

Proper positioning of teeth also helps in speech through correction of certain speech impediments or lisps caused by gap/spaces and improper alignment of teeth that might make it hard to pronounce certain sounds or words. The correction of tooth positions also aids in the proper closing and opening of our jaws and can address jaw problems and/or prevent grinding that tend to wear away certain teeth.

The achievement of this alignment also makes cleaning of the teeth and gums easier. Food tends to get trapped in between teeth and they become more difficult to remove upon brushing and even flossing. The build-up of plaque and bacteria in these areas promotes the occurrence of gum disease. If this is not addressed properly it can ultimately lead to the destruction of bone that supports our teeth through the condition called periodontitis. This loosens the teeth in time and can make them mobile; in their advanced stages, the tooth involved will have to be removed since they have become non-functional.

Medical Experts has also led to believe that poor oral health can lead to various health conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, dementia and respiratory infections.This is due to the fact that your teeth provides a direct path to your bloodstream where the infection can enter.

The presence of braces becomes a great reminder of how important it is to properly brush and floss our teeth because the brackets themselves are potential food traps. This reinforcement of dental hygiene will be carried out even after the removal of the braces and helps maintain healthy teeth.

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Can you use mouth wash instead of flossing?

Anyone who has tried flossing (and unsuccessfully prevented injuring their gums in the process) will know that it can be challenging to get into this habit.

The question is if mouth wash can be used as an alternative to flossing. We hate to be a bearer of bad news but the answer is no.

Many people would hands down choose mouthwash over flossing thinking that the former can be a substitute for the other. However, these two dental aids have different uses and are both needed to keep our teeth and gums healthy. 

"So what does mouthwash really do?" you might ask. Mouthwashes or mouth rinses are liquids we swish around the mouth usually after brushing and flossing. Most mouth washes that you can see in the supermarkets usually address bad breath but a lot of them also prevent bad bacteria from increasing in number in the mouth or sticking onto tooth surfaces.

While flossing involves the use of good hand dexterity, mouth washing gives us a hassle free way of cleansing around the inside of our mouth. It is also useful after dental surgery for areas that are not easy/painful to brush.

As good as all of these sound, flossing still tramples mouth washing in terms of removal of food debris and bacteria because it actually involves mechanical removal on the tooth surface. Much like how toothbrushes work, flossing scrapes away the bacteria in between the teeth that tooth brushing is not able to remove. 


A lot of us believe that flossing is an optional addition to brushing but these two go hand in hand in cleaning different areas of the teeth. After eating, you can see food debris that gets stuck in between teeth. Brushing these areas might make us feel like they're clean already, however, thin films of bacteria are still lodged in these tight areas and they can only be removed by flossing. If these area are not cleaned, in time cavities can develop which then means another trip to the dentist for new fillings. 

Granted mouth washes prevents and/or kills bacteria on our teeth, it does not effectively remove everything on the surface. A lot of mouth wash brands also only offer temporarily relief from bad breath. This can make us think that our mouth is clean because of the fresh and pleasant taste it leaves (and make us even lazier with using the floss).

The way to look at tooth brushing, flossing and using mouth wash is to see them as a triumvirate of oral health essentials. They each serve a specific purpose in cleaning our teeth and gums and needs to be used with proper technique to be able to be efficient.

As much as we'd like mouth wash to replace flossing, we definitely cannot substitute one from the other. Flossing may seem like a tedious thing but it ultimately gets the job done in preventing gum diseases and tooth decay.

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What is the Difference Between an Orthodontist and a Dentist?

Aren't dentists the same as Orthodontists? Aren't dentists - Orthodontists?  Well if not, what are the differences between a dentist and a orthodontist?

The short answer is that an orthodontist is a specialist dentist that focuses specifically in teeth, jaws and face to ensure not only for aesthetics, but also functionality.  An orthodontist studies much longer than a dentist and carries out significantly more training courses.

​When deciding on whether you want to have lingual braces, clear braces or even Invisalign braces, it is always recommended to see a specialist for more information.

​Generally once a dentist is certified through the means of a Bachelor degree, a full time course is required on top to become a specialist orthodontist which is done through a Masters of Science in Orthodontics. 

Orthodontic courses are generally very popular and some training facilities require extensive full time experience in the field before accepting new students.

If you would like more information on our Orthodontist, you can read about Dr Jeremy Chin and the team.

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